Lotus Flower
Upcoming Ceremony
Kosenrufu, Oko and
       Okyobi Ceremony

All ceremonies are in-person (open to all) & on LINE (Myoshoji Members only).

September 2022

Kosenrufu Shodaikai Ceremony 
Date: September 4th, 2022 (Sunday)
Time: 9:30AM

 

What is Kosenrufu Shodaikai?

The purpose of Kosen-rufu is to purify the people’s minds and the entire realm of the ultimate reality through the one, absolute, True Buddhism. This one hour Shodai is conducted at the direction of the High Priest who conducts a Kosen-rufu Shodaikai every first Sunday at the Head Temple Taisekiji and who has instructed that all Nichiren Shoshu temples to do the same.

 

 

Oko Ceremony & the 10th Anniversary of Establishment of Myoshoji Temple
Date: September 11th, 2022 
Time: 10:30AM

What is Oko?

In Nichiren Shoshu, we conduct the Oko Ceremony to repay our debt of gratitude for the profound benefit of the Three Treasures: Nichiren Daishonin (the Buddha), the Dai-Gohonzon (the Law) and Nikko Shonin and all the successive High Priests

(the Priesthood). The concept of acknowledging and repaying debts of gratitude, which is basic to the spirit of the Oko Ceremony, is essential to a correct understanding of True Buddhism and our own lives. 

 

Fall Higan-e Ceremony 

Date: September 25, 2022

Time: 10:30AM

What is Higan-e: Memorial Service During the Equinox?

In Nichiren Shoshu, the Higan-e Ceremony is conducted twice a year in Spring and Fall equinoxes.  The daylight and night time hours of the vernal and autumnal equinox are equal, signifying the inseparability of darkness (ying) and light (yang), as well as the oneness of good and evil. As the sutra expounds, “The Buddha desires the Middle Way.” For this reason the benefits of performing positive deeds on these days are superior to those practiced at other times. These days of the equinox present exceptional opportunities for us to arrive at “the other shore” (higan). Moreover, Buddhism expounds the four debts of gratitude one of which is to one’s parents and ancestors. Thus, during the Higan-e Ceremony, we make offerings to the Gohonzon, establish memorial tablets (tobas) for our ancestors and perform memorial services for them. This small good deed becomes a great positive act enabling us to reach “the other shore.” This is the true significance of the Higan-e Ceremony.